Home Product Review Can You Really Increase the Capacity of Existing Water Storage Tanks?

water storage tank
You might think two million gallons of water would be sufficient for anything. However, communities grow, and disasters happen – and that means there is a need for more water storage.

Increasing the capacity of the tank presents more than one problem, however – including the expense and space. Where would the new tank go? In addition, the tank is already operating in the water system, and the infrastructure is already in place. Is it really possible to increase the tank capacity?

Before anything else, work with a water storage tank builder, as they can help you maintain the footprint of the tank. Make sure the tank undergoes API 653 inspection as well to ensure the newly renovated tank will meet the state regulatory requirements.

Prep the Tank for Modifications

If you have two tanks, make sure to perform the work one tank at a time — while one of the is out of service, store the water in the other tank.

Prep the tank by cutting the shell away from the bottom. Remove the exterior components such as the ladder, the manway, and the overflow pipe in the meantime as well.

Install New Tank Shell, Shell Plates

Next, replace the tank shell with a new, larger one. Don’t forget to give some attention to the columns supporting the tank roof, including the new column pads and extensions.

After welding the shell plates, add a new ring to the bottom of the tank, as well as a new door sheet and manway. If it is an aboveground tank, make sure the installation is performed according to the API 653 standards.

Finish with a New Paint Job

After completing the tank capacity expansion, finish with a new paint job. Go for a high-performance, industrial coatings that are designed for chemical and corrosion resistance and thermal insulation.

If you have two tanks, repeat the instructions on the second tank once the first one is put into service. Your water reservoir just got bigger.

Water storage tanks are the symbol of communities, and they should be able to provide clean water to meet peak demands. Fortunately, modifications are possible.